Mcdonald mcwhiney celtic thesis

He married in He attended Centenary College on the G. Bill and earned an M.

Mcdonald mcwhiney celtic thesis

He married in He attended Centenary College on the G. He received his Ph. McWhiney became a noted specialist on the American Civil War era, as well as southern social and economic history.

He coauthored Attack and Die with his doctoral student Perry Jamieson. He published Braxton Bragg and Confederate Defeat, in two volumes, as well as many scholarly and popular articles and reviews.

He lectured frequently to both academic and popular audiences.

Mcdonald mcwhiney celtic thesis

McWhiney and Forrest McDonald were the authors of the "Celtic Thesis," which holds that most Southerners were of Celtic ancestry as opposed to Anglo-Saxonand that all groups he declared to be "Celtic" Scots-Irish, Irish, Scottish, Welsh and Cornish were descended from warlike herdsmen, in contrast to the peaceful farmers who predominated in England.

They attempted to trace numerous ways in which the Celtic culture shaped social, economic and military behavior. For example, they demonstrated that livestock raising especially of cattle and hogs developed a more individualistic, militant society than tilling the soil.

Attack and Die stressed the ferocity of the Celtic warrior tradition. In "Continuity in Celtic Warfare.

The Celts repeatedly took high risks that resulted in lost battles and lost wars. Celts were not self-disciplined, patient, or tenacious. They fought boldly but recklessly in the battles of Telamon BCCulloden and Gettysburg According to their thesis, the South lost the Civil War because Southerners fought like their Celtic ancestors, who were intensely loyal to their leaders but lacked efficiency, perseverance, and foresight.

In he argued the fundamental differences between North and South developed during the 18th century, when Celtic migrants first settled in the Old South. Some of the fundamental attributes that caused the Old South to adopt anti-English values and practices were Celtic social organization, language, and means of livelihood.

It was supposedly the Celtic values and traditions that set the agrarian South apart from the industrialized civilization developing in the North.

They also ignore the degree to which the Southern planter class resembled the English gentry in lineage, religion, and social structure. Furthermore his work avoids mentioning or acknowledging the fact that the largest group of pre-Revolution immigrants to the Southern colonies were English indentured servants who vastly outnumbered the "Celtic" settlers both in numbers and in cultural influence.

Over a year career, he trained 19 history Ph.

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McWhiney was a former director of the League of the Southbut he had broken with the group prior to his death. David Dalton has pointed out, he was "Controversial. For over three decades his writings have been discussed and debated but never disregarded.Cracker Culture: Celtic Ways in the Old South.

By Grady McWhiney with Forrest McDonald. (Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, ) Pp. In a very controversial but undeniably interesting book, Grady McWhiney takes a hand at explaining why the north and south differed so much before the Civil War.

ISSN with commentary by Forrest McDonald, and Grady McWhiney, pp. –; Fulltext: in Jstor. Berthoff rejects the Celtic Thesis because it exaggerates the numbers and roles of Celtic folk in the South, fails to define "Celtic," and misunderstands animal husbandry traditions in the British Isles.

reply by Berthoff, pp. – ISSN with commentary by Forrest McDonald, and Grady McWhiney, pp. –; Fulltext: in Jstor. Berthoff rejects the Celtic Thesis because it exaggerates the numbers and roles of Celtic folk in the South, fails to define "Celtic," and misunderstands animal husbandry traditions in the British Isles.

reply by Berthoff, pp. – Furthermore, McWhiney and McDonald have suggested obliquely that their Crackers, the majority white Southerners of Celtic ancestry, were a determining factor in the formation of an Old West culture.

Mcdonald mcwhiney celtic thesis

ISSN with commentary by Forrest McDonald, and Grady McWhiney, pp. –; Fulltext: in Jstor. Berthoff rejects the Celtic Thesis because it exaggerates the numbers and roles of Celtic folk in the South, fails to define "Celtic," and misunderstands animal husbandry traditions in the British Isles.

reply by Berthoff, pp. – Forrest McDonald He was a professor at the University of Alabama, where together with Grady McWhiney he developed the hypothesis that the South had been colonized by "Anglo-Celts", rather than the British Protestant farmers who populated the North.

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